All posts by Trib

A Tribute to all Black Men

by Dr. Jeanette Delaney Manns…(May 7, 2001)

Black man coming in many shades, don’t you know its not what they call you that makes you like pure gold? It’s the gift you are that makes you special. You are my father, my uncle, my brother, my cousin, my son, my nephew, my husband and my lover; but most of all you are my friend!

You are very special! Without you our race would not be. You are the cold black earth under my feet. You are the reason our race will not and can not accept defeat. My people have been under all kinds of stress. During the time of slavery you got your hands and feet cut off struggling to return to your family. No matter what happens you knew your destiny was to be there where God placed you, at the head of the household. Continue reading A Tribute to all Black Men

LEAP launches Solarize Virginia to make Residential Solar more accessible to Homeowners across Virginia

The Solarize Virginia program launches June 15 and goes to Aug. 30 in the Roanoke, Salem, and Blacksburg areas.

Adding solar power to your home is now easier and more affordable than ever, thanks to Solarize Virginia, a program that reduces the cost and complexity of going solar by providing a one-stop shop for education and installation. Through Aug. 30, residents can sign up to receive a free solar satellite and home energy assessment and gain access to discounted prices and vetted installers. 

 Continue reading LEAP launches Solarize Virginia to make Residential Solar more accessible to Homeowners across Virginia

Redefining the role of fatherhood

“What is so rare as a day in June,” asks one poet. Nothing would be the answer, if that day is Father’s Day.

Throughout the nation Father’s Day continues to gain recognition since its inception in 1910. When the custom began over a century ago the White father was basically viewed as sole breadwinner and master of all his possessions–that included his wife and children. Continue reading Redefining the role of fatherhood

Biden, Be Like Truman

Earlier this year, in praise of President Joe Biden’s legislative agenda, some people suggested that he was like the second coming of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. To which Congressman James Clyburn demurred. He said that Biden should not be like FDR. Perhaps he should be more like President Truman.

Many people were surprised at Clyburn’s statement. After all, was not FDR the reason African Americans switched from the Republican to the Democratic party? Continue reading Biden, Be Like Truman

Grace Lumpkin Faced the Facts of Racism. Schools Can Too.

by Patrick Chura, Ph.D.,
University of Akron

Novelist Grace Lumpkin was born in 1892 to a once-prestigious Georgia family that had lost its fortune during Reconstruction. Her father was a white supremacist who raised his children to adopt his views. In her childhood Lumpkin attended Klan rallies and participated in celebrations of the romantic splendor of the “Lost Cause” of the Confederacy.

Lumpkin’s first novel, To Make My Bread (published in 1932), includes revealing glimpses of racist rituals, drawn from her early memories. Continue reading Grace Lumpkin Faced the Facts of Racism. Schools Can Too.